Feeds:
Posts

Posts Tagged ‘natural disaster’

130912175502-08-colorado-flooding-0912-horizontal-gallery

The wild wind. Blustery season of weather change. From the blue sky bliss of the sun warming the earth switching to a torrential downpour in moments, it’s hard to know how to dress some days…

Sometimes an approaching storm feels like a lot more than just weather moving in. If the Lyons Colorado 1,000 year flood scenes are in your personal memory, your cells are going to respond differently to the sound of falling rain. If images like Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz mean anything personal to you, the breeze might rattle you a little more. If you’ve had traumatic experiences with natural disasters, the shifts and movements of the earth’s changing seasons bring up more than the promise of green grass tomorrow.

Our memory exists not in our brains but in our bodies. The mind might be where the senses replay the story of an event, but the body response precedes it activating physiologic change. The body tenses, the breathing quickens, the heartrate increases all to signals of stress.

Natural medicine tools:

  • Rescue Remedy – this homeopathic medicinal blend is useful for helping a person shift out of the fight or flight response. It is gentle enough for infants and all ages.

 

  • Passionflower tea – this wonderful herb is helpful for balancing neurotransmitters in the brain and creates a gentle calming effect on the body. It can help with sleep or just help take the edge off when feeling tense.

 

  • Magnesium – this nutrient is significantly deficient in many people, even with healthy diets. Magnesium facilitates muscle relaxation and can help with chronic tension that the body holds.

 

  • Sleep – our single most restorative activity, sleep helps the body and mind recover from stressful experiences. If you’re sleep is compromised, you’re more likely to experience elevated stress responses. Sometimes, it’s simply a matter of proper scheduling to allow for adequate sleep. However, if you have sleep issues like difficulty falling asleep or frequent waking, or feeling unrested upon waking in the morning, seek medical help.

 

  • Acupuncture & bodywork – tools that directly influence the body’s processing of stress hormones are invaluable to health. The release of endorphins in a controlled environment allows for re-balancing of the nervous system and aiding a deeper state of relaxation as a baseline.

 

  • Grounding – shifting the awareness from the head and the flurry of thoughts to the body changes our awareness and helps us to be more present to the reality of current circumstances. A daily practice of walking barefoot in the wet morning grass, shaking the body from head to toe and massaging the abdomen are all tools to cultivate presence in the body.

 

  • Hydrotherapy – contrasting heat and cold to the body surface is a traditional technique for optimal health. For calming the stress response, relaxing in a warm bath or shower and intermittently shifting the temperature to cool water helps to regulate the nervous system.

 

One thing is certain, the storms are going to keep coming. Preparing ourselves mentally, physically and emotionally allows us to be in the best possible state to handle the ever changing environment.

 

At Stillwater Clinic, our purpose is to provide the community with resources for your whole health. Visit us online at www.stillwaterhealingarts.com for more information and to schedule a visit today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Sometimes life unravels itself and everything you once knew to be true, changes. Your daily routine, the place you call home or the people you spend time with. Loss takes many forms and when we lose someone or something we love, we have to find a new way of life.

Adapting to Colorado’s flood last year has been a major life transition for so many along the front range. For some it is the biggest trauma of their lives. A sudden traumatic change often requires everything to change. The way we plan out our day, or do things automatically all of a sudden doesn’t work anymore.

Losing a child, partner, friend or parent changes us in our core. Our reflexive nature to tend to a loved one or reach out is altered. The daily routine has a major missing piece, without which we often don’t know what to do. As the needs of life continue to go on, we begin to plug away at the tasks at hand and feel an unsettled-ness continue. The process of grieving takes time, attention and then more time. As we resume life after a major event, there’s no wrong way to feel.

Unknown

Anytime you are going through a loss or life transition, support is necessary. Having someone to share the process with or just reflect. As well as supporting ones-self with a positive routine, using tools to help the journey continue to move along. Health is defined as being able to move freely through the entirety of the emotional spectrum, and then return to the peaceful center. There are a million ways to help do that.

Coming soon in your local area, Finding Home, a women’s self-care retreat is being offered to support those in need. Founded by Boulder practitioner Carolyn Flyer to give women the tools they need to more authentically move through grief and loss. And restoring women’s internal voice that supports their ability to nourish and say yes to themselves.

Beyond the acute care of grief, this program is designed to support the long-term assimilation of life’s changes. With the combination of Naturopathic care, emotional healing techniques and wisdom from Chinese medicine, Carolyn and I are working together to create a wonderful healing retreat.

This retreat will offer tools to restore the inner voice that guides us toward meeting our own needs. We will explore the emotions that accompany loss, not the story that keeps us from feeling it authentically. The program incorporates acupuncture, herbal medicine, nutrition, qigong, meditation & intuitive readings. All of this and more will make up your weekend with myself and my co-facilitator, Carolyn.

In 2001 Carolyn began working with ‘There With Care,’ a Boulder based support program for children and families facing critical illnesses. She continued to expand her work in grief support and is now a facilitator for the “Grief Support Network” in Boulder. The group allows people to bring their grief to a supportive environment in Boulder. They also bring phenomenal speakers to the Adi Shakti Kundalini Yoga Center on Sundays from 3-5pm.

Our upcoming retreat is August 22-24 in beautiful Fraser, Colorado. For information on registration, please call 303-928-9134 or email CarolynFlyer@hotmail.com. Financial support packages available to support any woman who feels in need of this program.

Dr. Sara Hart is the owner of Stillwater Healing Arts in Lyons, Colorado next door to the Dentist and Lyons Fitness. At Stillwater, we offer holistic family healthcare for all ages and stages of health. We incorporate tools from many traditions to find the best balance to support people in their optimal health as well as for treating disease. Visit us online at www.stillwaterhealingarts.com, call us at 303-823-9355 or email stillwaterclinic@gmail.com.

Read Full Post »

This article was published in the Lyons Recorder newspaper in response to the massive floods that destroyed the town in the fall of 2013…

130912175502-08-colorado-flooding-0912-horizontal-gallery

First there was the flood, then there were the decisions every person made to survive.  For most people, these were very different decisions than those made weeks and even days prior.  Instead of, “What should we have for dinner tonight,” it became “What is going to go bad the quickest that we need to eat first,” or “Where will I get my next meal?”

With the community bonding together, spirits were high, perhaps even manic.  The initial trauma of a natural disaster or other tragedy sends neurotransmitters and stress hormones sky-rocketing.  The experience becomes almost euphoric and provides the much needed additional resources (mentally, emotionally and physically) to sustain.

One by one the utilities went out, everyone was asked to leave.  Everyone experienced hardship of one kind or another; abruptly relocating to new homes, learning a new way to live and creating new routines.  The crisis continued to require everyone to rise to an unanticipated challenge and endure.

Then, the holidays came.  The season of joy, full of traditions deeply engrained and expectations to fulfill.  While some residents had returned to their homes, others were far from it and the switch to now celebrating holidays required a whole new energy burst to come through.  For some this was a relief, reconnecting with loved one’s and returning to faith.  However, the inevitable indulgences built into the holiday traditions flood the body with stimulating substances more likely to cause irritation than restoration.

For many residents of Lyons and the surrounding community, life has now settled into a new normal.  The stress is still elevated but it’s become routine and the expectation to tend to it all continues.  Despite the river’s worth of work to be done to restore this community, there is only so much anyone can do and eventually, something’s got to give.

Routine self-care is essential to maintaining health and longevity.  During times of life’s ease, simply sleeping 7-8 hours each night and maintaining a healthy diet and exercise routine can be adequat.  However, when faced with 5 months or more of unfathomable challenges, the body, mind and spirit are going to need a lot more care in order to maintain.

The normal, healthy balance of life is integrally related to the cortisol or circadian rhythm of the body.  In the morning, cortisol levels peak as we rise naturally to meet our day’s activity.  This cortisol peak works intimately with all the other neurotransmitters of the brain supporting the ability to think, learn, remember and feel good!  The normal cortisol rhythm naturally drops through the day, elevates slightly after our midday meal and descends gently into the evening.

Cortisol also shares a very close relationship with our reproductive hormones and thyroid gland influencing all aspects of metabolism.  When we experience stress, the body adjusts by elevating cortisol in order to respond.  However, this is meant to be a brief change, not something that continues long term.  With stress, eventually cortisol levels drop, unable to rise to meet the challenge of the day and overall metabolism begins to fail.

Symptoms of chronic stress include:

  • Weight Gain
  • Insomnia (difficulty falling asleep or maintaining sleep)
  • Poor digestion & nutrient assimilation
  • Memory loss
  • Decreased immune function – more frequent colds or increasing allergies
  • Fatigue
  • Increased inflammation
  • Anxiety & Depression
  • Slower reflex time, poor balance and clumsiness
  • Irrational behavior
  • Progression of chronic disease

Managing stress is one of the biggest challenges to health in our modern lives.  As a very intellectually oriented society, the needs of the body are easy to overlook.  We compensate with any of the readily available stimulants and press on through our days.  Eventually this inevitably catches up with us.

We’re not going to be able to avoid the stress in our lives, especially in Lyons.  But, we can counteract the challenges with stress-relieving tools.  Learning to care for our energy resevoir through lifestyle changes when we are under stress is key.  Using direct acting nervous system support is invaluable.

At Stillwater Healing Arts Clinic we have a wide array of tools both to assess and care for long lasting health.  Taking from traditions around the world, we utilize the best that medicine has to offer in conjunction with standard medical care.  We are now offering a unique opportunity for routine, affordable healthcare with our greatly reduced rates bundled in our Membership Program.  Please visit www.stillwaterhealingarts.com to learn more today!

Read Full Post »